NEW JERSEY’S CHIEF OPPONENT OF MARRIAGE EQUALITY

NEW JERSEY’S CHIEF OPPONENT OF MARRIAGE EQUALITY
SAYS LETTING SAME-SEX COUPLES MARRY
WOULD NOT AFFECT HIS MARRIAGE

 

New Jersey’s chief opponent of marriage equality, John Tomicki of the New Jersey Coalition to Preserve and Protect Marriage, stated yesterday that marriage equality for same-sex couples would not affect his marriage. His sweeping, quite puzzled response, “Why would it?” demolishes the argument that ending discrimination in marriage would destroy the institution.

Tomicki’s statement came at a news conference he held Tuesday after the New Jersey Civil Union Commission released a report evaluating the civil union law on its one-year anniversary. The Commission report detailed the vast array of problems that the civil union law inflicts on same-sex couples in New Jersey because employers, hospitals and other institutions do not respect civil unions as they do marriage.

At his news conference, Tomicki spoke, as he and his colleagues often do, about protecting the institution of marriage. Steven Goldstein, chair of Garden State Equality, pointed out that he and several others in the LGBT community had already gotten married to their same-sex partners in Canada or elsewhere, and have been living in New Jersey without destroying the institution.

The following exchange, captured on audiotape, took place between Goldstein and Tomicki:

Goldstein: “You’re still married after 50 years, right? So my marriage has not affected your marriage.”

Tomicki responded incredulously: “Why would it?”

Though opponents of marriage equality continue to make abstract statements that marriage equality would destroy the institution of marriage, the opponents have failed to produce any married opposite-sex couples who will state with certainty that their marriages will be destroyed when New Jersey lets same-sex couples marry.

Goldstein said, “Several same-sex couples in New Jersey have gotten married in Canada and the world is still turning, the Jersey Shore is still beautiful, Garden State Plaza is still packed, and it’s still tough to book weddings at catering halls across the state.